Posts Tagged ‘wireless’

The Answer Is Here! Solving Your Property’s Cellular Coverage Issues

April 12, 2013
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Ericsson reported in 2012 that from the third quarter of 2009 to the fourth quarter of 2011, mobile data transmission increased by 600 percent. Projections by Cisco seem to indicate that the trend will continue, especially as more video is delivered over the internet.

Indoor cellular coverage is becoming increasingly more important- literally by the day. The Pew Research Center reports that smartphone ownership has increased dramatically over the course of 2011-2012, from 35% to 46% of US adults, totaling a 31% increase in less than one year. Add to this the research conducted by Ericsson reported in 2012, showing a 600% increase in mobile data transmissions between the third quarter of 2009 and fourth quarter of 2011 alone, and it becomes undeniably evident that we are knee deep in the wireless revolution. In fact, 80% of multifamily residents now use their mobile phones as their primary phone, as the land line slowly recedes into the night of technologies past. The disappearance of the corded phone is being solidified by new business models introduced by money hungry cell phone companies; these giants are privy to the fact that data usage far outweighs voice communications, and have incented consumers to do away with land lines, by offering unlimited talk time, while adding (not-so-unlimited) data usage fees.

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The Pew Research Center reports that smartphone ownership increased from 35 percent of U.S. adults in 2011 to more than 46 percent of U.S. adults in 2012, a 31 percent increase in less than one year.

All of these changes, quite rapid changes mind you, are creating unintended consequences for many multifamily building owners and residents alike. As the building industry shifts focus towards energy conservation and more sustainable building practices it has become evident that many of the new building materials are particular resistant to cellular service penetration. As you can imagine, this is posing a huge problem for building owners and residents, especially as people become increasingly reliant on wireless technologies. If residents don’t have cellular service inside their homes, how will they make calls to friends and family? More importantly, how will they call 911?? These questions are not to be ignored.

Over 20 times a week someone from the multifamily industry is contacting Spot On Networks for suggestions on how to deal with this difficult, time-consuming, and potentially very costly issue. At Spot On Networks we have dedicated an enormous amount of time to helping building owners combat their cellular dilemmas, and are happy to say, we have just the solution for you.

The right answer can vary from property to property, dependent on the exact circumstances, budget, and level of convenience necessary for residents. The first solution is the DAS System. DAS stands for Distributed Antenna System, and can be quite costly to implement, coupled with extensive installation. Spot On has configured a solution to not only eliminate poor cellular coverage, but to offset the cost of installing an extravagant DAS System: CellBOOST. CellBOOST typically costs about 1/5 of a DAS System, AND provides property wide WiFi.  CellBOOST boosts cellular signal within a building by strategically placing a number of bidirectional amplifiers within the building, and a donor antennae on the roof which receives the cellular service from outdoors. CellBOOST is non-carrier specific, and is Passpoint 2.0 ready for the up and coming technologies.

The second possible solution would be to use existing WiFi applications. If WiFi is available at a property, residents can use mobile VoIP applications, such as Skype as an alternative phone service to make all of their calls, including calls to emergency services- however the location of said caller is not as visible as otherwise. For texting, there is an app called WhatsApp, which enables texts to be sent via Wi-Fi.

Lastly, the lonely Femtocell. The Femtocell is a small, low-power cellular base station designed for in home use. Although each carrier dubs the device something different, all versions are similar operationally: Plug in an internet cable, and use cell service from a single carrier (hence the “lonely”) in an individual apartment (for a fee, of course).

All of these solutions have their own pros and cons, however, when we take a look at the future, it becomes clear that the more effective solution for the long term would be along the lines of CellBOOST. Within a few months, the WiFi Alliance and the Wireless Broadband Alliance will release a compatible set of protocols and procedures that make WiFi networks complementary to cell carrier networks. ImageThe service, called Hotspot 2.0, uses the WiFi Alliance’s Passpoint 2.0 certification procedure for product certification to promote secure, seamless roaming between cell services and WiFi networks. (Read more here.) The first Hotspot 2.0 solution is expected to be introduced during 2013. Some access points are already Passpoint 2.0 certified, such as those deployed by Spot On Networks, used in CellBOOST. It is imperative to take a look at your property’s cellular coverage issues with an eye on the future- the DAS System will not hold up to the Hotspot 2.0, and neither will Femtocell. With all of these solutions available, cellular coverage issues within a building are soon to be a thing of the past (much like the beloved land line…), however, the important thing is choosing the right solution for your needs, and one that will stand the test of time.

Just How Important is Wi-Fi?

January 14, 2013

The proof is in the pudding. A recent survey conducted by global research and consultancy firm Analysys Mason for Amdocs reveals that not only is Wi-Fi evolving into a critical differentiator for service providers, but also revealed just how important it is.

                Regardless of lingering technical and business related issues, 89% of all surveyed service providers (which include fixed, mobile, and cable), either already have or planned to deploy/leverage a Wi-Fi network. In addition to this, respondents rated the importance of Wi-Fi as >7 out of 10, with emphasis on the value of Wi-Fi for growth as a service provider.  Most business owners tend to equate “Wi-Fi” with free access, and, if this is you, this might be key to differentiating your business. Free Wi-Fi access is a great way to essentially reward your customers for their patronage, and incents them to come back. With many network providers also offering email marketing kits linked to the Wi-Fi network, there is no limit to the advantages and benefits one might yield. Think as a business owner for a second: if you had the ability to completely customize the splash page of your in-house Wi-Fi network with branding, offers, coupons, and other enticing offers for your customers, wouldn’t you fully take advantage of this massive marketing advantage? Sounds like a win-win situation for business owners and service providers alike.Image

                It is no secret that people want Wi-Fi, and they want it everywhere—seamlessly. Numerous municipal efforts to implement Wi-Fi prove this; and although many of those efforts have been terminated, cities are still striving for blanket Wi-Fi availability, including Chicago and Seattle who are both looking toward the advent of public and private networks, and New York City who just made an agreement with Google to light up part of the city.

                A “seamless experience”, between cellular and Wi-Fi, which rated a staggering 8.1 out of 10 by those surveyed, still proves to be one of the top technical barriers in deploying; second only to authentication issues.  Amdocs own vice president for product solutions marketing, Rebecca Prudhomme, stated, “This underscores the importance of having secure, scalable authentication and authorization solutions in place for ensuring a seamless experience as customers move in and out of the Wi-Fi network. Furthermore, real-time policy control opens up new opportunities for Wi-Fi monetization by allowing service providers to offer a range of differentiated services over Wi-Fi, such as tiered services and premium quality of service.” Which brings me to my next point:

                Monetization. As most of the technical issues will be sorted out in due time, another area which needs a fair amount of innovation are service providers’ monetization models. While a generous 57% of service providers whom have already deployed Wi-Fi networks state they are monetizing their offerings, the survey also found that many of them are looking to revamp “old” monetization models which eliminate directly charging customers.

“Our research shows that while the service provider Wi-Fi market is still in its early stages, service providers are adopting a forward looking attitude that goes beyond using regular Wi-Fi to offload congested 3G and 4G networks. While offload is still a priority, it’s clear that service providers are looking to service provider Wi-Fi as a competitive differentiator, and there is strong interest in exploring new and innovative business models for Wi-Fi monetization.”,  said Chris Nicoll, principal analyst at Analysys Mason. This survey has revealed much about where the service providers will likely take the market next, and has also shed some insight onto the importance of Wi-Fi for not only data offload, but for a competitive advantage.Freeing up data with the implementation of Wi-Fi networks, either city-wide or more localized will certainly be a massive stepping stone in this technological era we are experiencing.  

Crossing the Bridge to Cellular, Energy, and Financial Efficiency

October 24, 2012

It is important for Property Owners to think ahead while building and/or renovating a property for any number of reasons, but as the green movement and the WiFi revolution advance simultaneously there become more obstacles to overcome, and with that, more solutions.
Richard J. Sherwin, CEO of Spot On Networks states, “The typical apartment owner needs to figure out how to solve the cellular wireless problem”, in an article written for Multifamilybiz.com on October 23, 2012. Sherwin continues, adding, “The signal does not penetrate buildings with energy preserving glass.”, which proves a huge hurdle for Property Owners, as they strive for energy efficiency and top notch technology to suit their tenants.


It is no secret that cell service is huge must for today’s renters; Mike Smith, director or Building Technology Services Group for Forest City Enterprises, knows this firsthand. “As residents tour our properties, they’re looking to see if their phones will work,” says Smith in that same article. Smith continues, “We have projects in Washington D.C. and we go out beforehand and have great cell coverage. Then you put the building up and it’s sustainable and LEED-certified and it kills the reception.”
There are a few solutions available today to combat this issue; however, most are extremely expensive and simply out of reach for many Property Owners. One cost efficient solution is to implement a property-wide wireless internet network, which also offers cell phone data transmission. This affords residents seamless cellular connectivity, even if a building is posing as gate-keeper for cell service. Not only that, but your residents will be thrilled with the adjunct of property wide wireless internet.

Active Connected Devices: Infiltrating the population in full force

September 21, 2012

Whether you are wireless with the masses, or still weighted by a wired ball and chain, chances are you are the proud owner of (on average in the US) 5 active connected devices. Wait what? 5? Active connected devices? Back it up.
Yes. As unbelievable as that is, it is accurate, at least according to some pretty interesting statistics recently released by Chetan Sharma Consulting. For those of you not familiar with the term, an Active Connected Device is any device actively used to connect directly to the internet; examples of these include but are not limited to: desktop computers, televisions, gaming consoles, phones, media players, even cars.

Personally, I was shocked when I first read the staggering statistics. Their study states that Globally there are approximately 10 Billion connected devices, a humble 70% of those devices being qualified as mobile, be it phone, laptop, tablet, or other untethered device. Although the survey does not provide us with a statistic on what percentage of the 10 Billion global devices the United States is responsible for, it does offer us a multitude of other interesting information.

In the United States alone, 80% of the actively connected devices are mobile; tablets and ereaders comprising 13%, smartphones coming in at an estimated 18%, and computers taking the lead at 22%. In another study that Chetan Sharma Consulting released, they estimated that the mobile data market has grown substantially over the last year, composing 42% of the US mobile industry revenues for 2012, estimated to reach an astronomical $80 billion this year alone! It’s no wonder the wi-fi market is full steam ahead.

The one statistic that truly surprised me was how many devices different age groups owned. I was sincerely shocked to learn that the unsuspecting 65+ bracket held the torch for highest percentage of more than 15 connected devices, coming in somewhere around 12%.

This study just goes to show the advances society is making under the influence of wi-fi, especially as it is becoming so readily available. The proof is in the pudding. If it’s not wireless, why bother?

 

http://www.chetansharma.com/USmarketupdateQ22012.htm

http://www.chetansharma.com/connectedconsumer.htm

 

Verizon, Google and the Net Neutrality Debate

August 17, 2010
Image: socialsignal.com

Hot on the tech news circuit last week was the Net Neutrality debate which is heating up as more companies begin to take sides.  If you are not familiar with what has been happening in the world of Net Neutrality, here’s a quick synopsis:

About a week ago, Google and Verizon, proposed an agreement that would seal the deal on Net Neutrality (keeping the Internet open), but it had one [not so] small catch.  In the agreement, wireless, mobile broadband would receive an exemption from Internet openness.  This has begun to spark massive debate over what would happen if this “proposal” were actually presented as a piece of legislation (this would need congressional and FCC approval and is not simply a business deal).  You can read the official agreement here. Concern has been label by some as “cable-ization” of the Internet – content that used to be all fair game and evenly accessible would be able to be pushed ahead, eliminated altogether,”premier” Internet content could be made available to those who paid more for their mobile service and certain users might receive “prioritized” content.

Anyone who has read an ounce of technology news in the last year understands that this is a very big deal.  With Smartphones making up for over 20% of the cellular industry and Wi-Fi networks appearing almost everywhere, it is safe to say that the future will be a wireless world.  I find it almost comical that wired Internet openness is protected in proposal…what a perfect distraction from what is really going on here!  Who cares so much about wired Internet when the whole world is becoming mobile?

Companies have begun to choose sides.  For example AT&T, which would obviously benefit from having more control over the content that is delivered and sold to it’s subscribers call the proposal, according to the New York Times, “a reasonable framework”.  On the flip side, companies that were born out of Internet openness like those of Facebook, were coming out not in support of the proposal.

Today the debate pot was stirred again as House Democrats “slammed” the proposal, according to PCWorld, in fact the proposal prompted Reps, Edward Markey, Anna Eshoo, Mike Doyle, and Jay Inslee to write a letter to the FCC chairman urging him to act on broadband regulation.  The letter referred to Internet doomsday prophesy such as, “closing the open Internet”, “inconsistent principals”, and creating demographics where users who need content the most would not be able to obtain it.

According to PCWorld, Richard Whitt, Washington telecom and media counsel for Google defended the proposal, stating, “No other company is working as tirelessly for an open Internet”.  That being said, the writing on the wall is very real and does present a future in which the, Internet-as-we-know-it, may suffer greatly.

For more on The Net Neutrality Debate, check out these articles:

NYT

PCWorld

Fiercebroadbandwireless.com